This project (2018-1-ES01-KA203-050606) has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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Using Theater to Teach Clinial Empathy: A Pilot Study ¬– a controlled trial whose objective was to assess whether medical residents can acquire clinical empathy techniques with the help of an empathy curriculum taught by theater professors.


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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6345783_Using_Theater_to_Teach_Clinical_Empathy_A_Pilot_Study
Story of the object
Clinical empathy, a critical skill for the doctor–patient relationship, is infrequently taught in graduate medical education. No study has tested if clinical empathy can be taught effectively.
OBJECTIVE: To assess whether medicine residents can learn clinical empathy techniques from theater professors.
DESIGN: A controlled trial of a clinical empathy curriculum taught and assessed by 4 theater professors. SETTING: Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, a large urban university and health system. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty Internal Medicine residents: 14 in the intervention group, 6 in the control group. INTERVENTION: Six hours of classroom instruction and workshop time with professors of theater. MEASUREMENTS: Scores derived from an instrument with 6 subscores designed to measure empathy in realtime patient encounters. Baseline comparisons were made using two-sample T tests. A mixed-effects analysis of variance model was applied to test for significance between the control and intervention groups. RESULTS: The intervention group demonstrated significant improvement (p≤.011) across all 6 subscores between pre-intervention and post-intervention observations. Compared to the control group, the intervention group had better posttest scores in 5 of 6 subscores (p≤.01).
LIMITATIONS: The study was neither randomized nor blinded.
CONCLUSIONS: Collaborative efforts between the departments of theater and medicine are effective in teaching clinical empathy techniques.
Label
Authors: Dow, Alan & Leong, David & Anderson, Aaron & Wenzel, Richard. (2007)
Title: Using Theater to Teach Clinical Empathy: A Pilot Study
Publication: Journal of general internal medicine