This project (2018-1-ES01-KA203-050606) has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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Digital Objects

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The child of Fidene


Place where the object is located
It is located in the Museum of the History of Medicine in Rome
Story of the object
It represents the evidence of the surgical practice of skull drilling in the Roman civilization of the Imperial Age, whose discovery dates back to 1995
Unit of the Educational Material connected (2 - 1)
Label
Perfectly preserved skeleton of a child from the 2nd century A.D. Preserved under a case that stabilises the micro-climatic environment. It is a 5-year-old child who underwent craniotomy surgery for a brain pathology that increased endocranial pressure causing terrible migraines. The child survived for about 30-40 days as can be seen from the signs of regrowth of bone tissue. His age is determined by the milk teeth present and the length of the bones.