This project (2018-1-ES01-KA203-050606) has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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The story of the Mărcuţa sanatorium


Place where the object is located
Bucharest, in Pantelimon
Story of the object
In Pantelimon, an area that could at any time, without much effort, win the unofficial title of "Bucharest's ugliest neighborhood", there are traces of Mihai Eminescu's last passing through life. They are disguised, surrounded by tall blocks and covered by the infernal battle of road traffic, which goes only a few tens of meters away. Here was once the Mărcuţa sanatorium, the place where the one considered to be the national poet of Romania spent the best part of his last year of life. The story of Mărcuţa, the history of this place was covered up twice. Once in power, the communists turned it into a re-education school, and the last signs of "patient Eminescu" (poems written on the walls of the room) were erased by a whitewash. A little closer to immediate modernity, the place was transformed by the "capitalists" into another re-education center, but with a more friendly name: "Complex of Recreational and Educational Activities".
At that time, the Mărcuţa sanatorium had become an extremely respected medical center in the country, and had even managed to be mentioned, even though scarcely and as a medical curiosity, by foreign specialized magazines. This is how it was described in a Viennese publication by Dr. S.H. Scheiber, in 1868: “In the village of Mărcuţa, near Bucharest, there is a hospital for the insane. It has 170 beds, both for the mentally ill and for the incurable. A high wall surrounds the hospital. Care is generally human.”
In 1864, the medical unit had been among the first in the country to adopt an internal regulation called "Regulation of the Mărcuţa Hospice Service". It stated that the patients are treated with money from the Government. It also analyzed the treatment capacity, the diet, "receiving and leaving the lunatics from the hospice" and described "the bedding, clothing and cleaning measures".


Source: https://adevarul.ro/cultura/istorie/povestea-sanatoriului-marcuta-ultima-oprire-apacientului-eminescu-1_50f7c881dc344dc202469bb5/index.html
Label
For a long time, the name of Mărcuţa Monastery was related to that of the mental illness settlement that had been here for almost a century, from 1838 to 1925. As well as the image of Eminescu, a patient of the sanatorium, from February 3, 1889.
The Mărcuţa Church - one of the oldest in the Capital - still lives today, behind the blocks of flats on Pantelimon Road. However, the monastery, like so many others in old Bucharest, only exists in the history books and memoirs.

Source: https://jurnalul.ro/campaniile-jurnalul/bucuresti-555-de-ani/bucuresti-555-marcuta-manastire-cetate-ospiciu-678243.html