This project (2018-1-ES01-KA203-050606) has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.
This web site reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Select language   >   EL ES IT RO EN

Digital Objects

Back to Digital Objects

People in the House of Hope. A documentary more about life and less about death (2019)


Place where the object is located
People in the House of Hope. A documentary more about life and less about death (2019) – documentary showing the perspective on palliative care after communism

The documentary can be found on Recorde.ro website; Recorder is a publication created and owned by journalists
https://recorder.ro/oamenii-din-casa-sperantei-un-documentar-mai-mult-despre-viata-si-mai-putin-despre-moarte/

but also on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-s95OyhPK_w (available in English also, as subtitle)
Story of the object
After the fall of communism, Graham Perrols, a British citizen, responsible for opening a hospice care in his hometown, returned to Romania, with the hope of opening another palliative center in the country he fell in love with by accident. The documentary offers a take on communism from an outsider’s perspective while also giving an insight on Romanians’ beliefs and level of trust in people, left as a legacy by communism.

Hospice Care “Casa Speranței” is the first hospice in Romania, whose setting up also established the foundation of palliative care in this country. Throughout the years, it helped several terminally-ill patients, while also shaping the general consensus on volunteering, altruism and social role-models.

1992, Hospice Casa Speranţei, a foundation started by a British citizen, introduced to Romania the idea of ​ relieving pain for patients with incurable diseases or with limited life expectancy. Over time, the Romanians in distress and their families have learned a lesson that no one has taught them: that the life quality is more important than its quantity.

But above all, Hospice House of Hope brought to the Romanian society an almost unbelievable idea at the beginning of the '90s. That some doctors and some nurses can do good without asking for anything in return. That you can trust this unconditionally. We have gathered in a documentary a few stories and some people who, without necessarily wanting this, wrote the history of palliative care in Romania.

HOSPICE of Hope provides free palliative care services for adults diagnosed with cancer and for children with various diseases with limited life expectancy (cancer, leukemia, neuro-muscular dystrophies, congenital malformations, chronic organ failure and other rare incurable diseases).
Label
A 30 minutes documentary, filmed in Romania (Brasov, Buchares) and England (Kent). The short-movie was created by Recorder, a group of independent journalists, who tackle social and political dilemmas of Romania.

The documentary can be found on their website https://recorder.ro/ , but also on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-s95OyhPK_w .